Dating back to 200 BC,  the Ketubah’s most basic role has been to be used as a prenuptial, highlighting responsibilities and protecting the brides’ rights in case of divorce or death.

I create anniversary ketubahs and do replacement/ restoration ketubahs for those who have either lost their ketubah and are interested in creating one from scratch or updating the existing design by replacing the artwork on it.

Services to non-Jews who are inspired by the Ketubah tradition (such as Quaker certificates, vows, anniversary ketubahs) are available as well.

The Orthodox and Conservative texts use the same Aramaic one that has been used for decades while the contemporary ketubah text is a poetic version of the standard.  Most clients, if go about it the Orthodox route typically have me use the standard Aramaic Orthodox text.  And if they don’t mind having smaller font with the dual text languages, some request the dual text option of a contemporary text placed alongside the standard Orthodox Aramaic text.

*According to certain rabbinical authorities, having a proper ketubah is as important as having a proper mezuzah.  Certain rabbinical sources have even considered it as if the couple isn’t married if they do not have a proper ketubah.  I work with a number of rabbis who work with people of all levels of faith, collaborate with them to ensure that each text reflects each couple’s standards and style.

After the ceremony, I highly recommend encasing or framing one’s artwork with sturdy material.  If you want to have the ketubah framed before the wedding, just make sure to let the framer know to frame it in a certain way where you can take it out and put it back in.  Not taking the presentation of the ketubah seriously, it becomes prone to getting misplaced or lost.  

melody.molayem@gmail.comThe Ketubah